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Rackspace Becomes 2-Tier Distributor in Microsoft CSP

Rackspace announced it has become a 2-Tier distributor in the Microsoft Cloud Solution Provider (CSP) program on Thursday.

The rare designation means that companies in the Rackspace Partner Network will be able to resell or refer Office 365 and Microsoft Azure to customers.

Microsoft's CSP program has three main levels: 1-Tier, 2-Tier distributors and 2-Tier resellers. The 1-Tier partners get to sell Microsoft cloud products directly to customers in their own services bundles, handling billing and support themselves. Until Thursday, Rackspace had been a 1-Tier partner.

The 2-Tier distributors are a more elite group that sit between Microsoft and the customer-facing 2-Tier reseller partner. The 2-Tier reseller buys the Office 365 or Azure service from the 2-Tier distributor on the customer's behalf or, in some cases, refers the sale to the 2-Tier distributor. Details vary depending on the 2-Tier distributor's program.

Already operating as 2-Tier distributors in the United States are App River, Ingram Micro, Intermedia, SherWeb, Synnex and Tech Data. Worldwide there were nearly three dozen last year, although Rackspace says fewer than 10 hosting providers globally offer the entire Microsoft cloud suite.

The Rackspace arrangement, formally called the Rackspace Reseller and Referral Program for Fanatical Support for Azure and Office 365, will offer the 5-time Microsoft Hosting Partner of the Year's signature "Fanatical Support" as part of the offering. Other features of the CSP offering that Rackspace's 2,800 resellers can leverage include customer migration and deployment assistance, support escalations, a dedicated reseller program team and sales/marketing support.

Both Office 365 and Azure will be available to Rackspace's U.S. partners, while an Azure-only version will be offered in other geographies.

Posted by Scott Bekker on July 07, 2016 at 11:44 AM0 comments


WPC 2016 Preview: 9 Big Themes

RCP analyzed the Worldwide Partner Conference session catalog to help partners get the most out of the show or to track it from the office. For more on WPC 2016, visit our event page here.

There will always be surprises at the Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC). Otherwise, what would be the point of attending? (Oh, yeah, the networking.) Anyway, here are a few major themes you can expect to hear a lot about.

1. Building the Intelligent Cloud: A few years ago, it might have been worth calling out Office 365, Dynamics CRM Online, Microsoft Azure or hybrid cloud as themes. Now, those technologies form the backdrop against which the majority of the sessions are set. Look at almost every session description and it deals with the Microsoft cloud stack in some way.

Other technology themes spanning much of the session content, according to a Microsoft spokesperson, include "Reinventing Productivity and Business Processes," "Creating More Personal Computing" and "Digital Transformation."

2. Partner Profitability: Dozens of sessions involve advice, panel discussions and case studies of the ways partners are structuring their businesses to maximize profitability, particularly around the cloud.

3. New Buyer: While we only found one session covering this topic, it's been a recurring talking point out of Microsoft of late. The idea is that as cloud applications become quicker to set up and require, or seem to require, less integration, the IT department no longer has sole ownership of technology spending.

4. M&A: Several sessions at the WPC cover mergers and acquisitions, growth strategies with an exit strategy in mind, and related topics. It's not just Microsoft providing this content. The appetite for M&A sessions is exploding across various vendors' partner conferences.

5. Meet the New Channel Chief: At Microsoft, the channel chief tends to go by the official title of corporate vice president (CVP) of the Worldwide Partner Group (WPG). Gavriella Schuster was named to that role in late June after former channel chief Phil Sorgen moved into a CVP job within the U.S. Enterprise & Partner Group.

Expect some introductions to Schuster at the conference, although she's a familiar figure to partners, having delivered keynotes at the last two WPCs.

In the meantime, Schuster provided her own brief preview of the themes for WPC in an e-mailed statement to RCP: "Meeting with partners throughout the year is one of the highlights of my job, but WPC is really something special and I look forward to it each year. This year I'm personally excited for the opportunity to thank our partners, and to talk with them about what they can do right now to grow their business, and share how Microsoft is investing to connect our partners with customers."

6. LinkedIn Deal: Microsoft's blockbuster deal to buy LinkedIn for $26.2 billion has a lot of implications for partners. It might not be discussed from the main stage, but it will definitely be a topic of conversation in the hallways and around lunch tables.

7. SharePoint: Microsoft unveiled major updates to SharePoint in recent months, and there's a lot of unpacking of partner opportunity to do in the WPC sessions this year.

8. Skype for Business: A lot of sessions cover Microsoft's unified communications offering, a good signal of the strategic importance of the platform for Microsoft in fiscal year 2017.

9. Cloud Solution Provider (CSP): The 2015 WPC was the debutante ball for Microsoft's CSP program. While there may be less hype, there are a lot more specifics on CSP coming at the 2016 WPC, including roadmap sessions, details on integrating CSP with a Microsoft practice and educational sessions from Microsoft's CSP distribution partners.

Posted by Scott Bekker on July 07, 2016 at 6:28 AM0 comments


WPC 2016 Preview: 9 Eye-Catching Sessions

RCP analyzed the Worldwide Partner Conference session catalog to help partners get the most out of the show or to track it from the office. For more on WPC 2016, visit our event page here.

These Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC) sessions are unlikely to transform anyone's business, but they promise to be entertaining, thought-provoking or both.

1. Trust and the Microsoft Cloud: A year ago Microsoft's top lawyer Brad Smith made his first WPC appearance with a well-received talk about the company's attempts to balance government investigatory requests with customers' privacy expectations. Microsoft is taking the topic further this year with a session on the Microsoft Trusted and National Cloud offerings.

2. #cloudready: A few sessions about "Building a #cloudready Business" (hashtag Microsoft's) require partners to do some homework first. An online cloud self-assessment tool takes 15 minutes and will give attendees some baseline information for the discussion.

3. Partner-to-Partner (P2P) Challenges/Solutions: The cloud tool isn't the only self-assessment tool prepared for the WPC. Microsoft also created a P2P Assessment app for partners to download ahead of the session. The exercise is supposed to help partners step through a P2P Maturity Model. In addition to the assessment-based sessions, Microsoft is also holding sessions encouraging partners to expand into the CRM Online business by teaming up with Dynamics partners.

4. The Dogfood Sessions: Microsoft IT will run several sessions at the WPC explaining how Microsoft's self-described first, best customer uses the company's technologies.

5. Enabling the Journey to Cloud: Julia White, who leads product management of the Microsoft Cloud Platform, will outline the theoretical progression customers could make across Microsoft's stack from on-premises to hybrid to Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) to Platform as a Service (PaaS).

6. The Future of Technology: A Microsoft Distinguished Engineer, James Whittaker, will walk attendees through the history of technology to arrive at "some startling predictions" about Big Data and the Internet of Things (IoT), according to the session description.

7. Security Trends: Microsoft Chief Information Security Officer Bret Arsenault is providing an overview of the threats keeping CISOs like himself awake at night, along with a discussion of solutions to help manage those problems.

8. What's Next for Windows 10 Mobile: Anyone looking for specifics in Microsoft's muddy mobile strategy might find a few details in this session. Interestingly, amid many sessions on Microsoft devices, at least one session includes a mention of the Lumia line of smartphones.

9. Pop Culture: A couple of fun session titles could signal good sessions. One is "Business Lessons from the Grateful Dead." The other is "Kirk vs. Spock: How To Make 25th Century Decisions."

Posted by Scott Bekker on July 06, 2016 at 6:29 AM0 comments


WPC 2016 Preview: 9 Must-See Sessions

RCP analyzed the Worldwide Partner Conference session catalog to help partners get the most out of the show or to track it from the office. For more on WPC 2016, visit our event page here.

If you think of the Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC) in terms of the old Microsoft phrase "drinking from the firehose" for getting up to speed at a disorientingly fast rate, this is the group of sessions that forms the core of the conference's infodump.

1. Satya Nadella Vision Keynote: The Microsoft CEO usually kicks off the conference from the big stage, laying out the themes and making some major news announcements.

2. Kevin Turner Vision Keynote: Just as Nadella opens the conference, COO Turner comes in for the big finish. In a presentation usually filled with competitive barbs, kick-in-the-pants motivation and chock-full of Microsoft boosterism, Turner reinforces the themes and sends the crowd home with some chuckles.

[Update, 7/7: After this article was published, Microsoft announced that Kevin Turner was leaving the company. Read the article here.]

3. Microsoft Partner Network (MPN) Vision Keynote: In addition to product group keynotes, Microsoft usually provides an MPN keynote filled with program momentum details and programmatic and incentive announcements.

4. Office 365 Roadmap: In the running with Azure for Microsoft's most strategic product is Office 365. Microsoft plans to give partners a detailed roadmap for the Office 365 family of cloud services in a special session.

5. FastTrack: A major source of conflict between Microsoft and partners is Microsoft FastTrack, the controversial program and internal onboarding center to provide customers with free migrations to Office 365 and other cloud products. Microsoft will openly make its case for partner opportunities around FastTrack in a WPC session.

6. SMS&P Enterprise Partner General Session: This is the public session where Microsoft's heavyweight partners, the licensing solution providers (LSPs), get details on how their incentives will work. At recent WPCs, LSPs have generally learned that their incentives were going down. Changes in LSP compensation can push those partners into conflict with smaller partners for services revenues, making the session important beyond the exclusive LSP community.

7. U.S. Field Priorities: The WPC is an international conference, but a plurality of attendees usually comes from the United States. For those U.S. partners, the U.S. field priorities session provides information on Microsoft's co-engagement plans with partners.

8. MPN 101: New partners especially can benefit from an overview session on the MPN. Benefits discussed include internal use rights, technical support, marketing materials and incentives.

9. PIE: Another valuable session for new and experienced partners is an update on the Microsoft Partner Incentive Engine (PIE), which Microsoft describes as a partner's single access point to a pool of $20 million that partners can use for marketing, pilots and deployment programs.

Posted by Scott Bekker on July 05, 2016 at 6:28 AM0 comments


LinkedIn's CEO Is Your Next High-Profile 'Softie

With the LinkedIn acquisition, expect Jeff Weiner to be a major player at Microsoft. The question is, for how long?

The top executives of large companies that Microsoft acquires frequently become major movers and shakers within Microsoft, at least for a while. See Bates, Tony; Elop, Stephen; and Ozzie, Ray.

Nowhere is that more likely to be true than for the CEO of the company that Microsoft is spending more money to acquire than it has spent on any company in the past, LinkedIn.

So who is Jeff Weiner, the lightly-bearded/heavily-stubbled CEO of LinkedIn, who will retain that job title overseeing a largely independent LinkedIn business unit for Microsoft should the deal close as expected this year?

He's a Silicon Valley star who held prominent positions at Yahoo Inc. from 2001 to 2008, winding up as the executive vice president of the Network Division, which involved managing 3,000 employees and running Yahoo's Front Page, Mail, Search and Media products.

After Yahoo, he was briefly an executive in residence at venture capital firms Accel Partners and Greylock before joining LinkedIn in December 2008 as president in a management shakeup that saw founder Reid Hoffman retake the CEO role. Weiner was named CEO a mere six months later, after what many in the industry viewed as a trial run as president.

During Weiner's tenure as CEO, LinkedIn has gone from about 42 million registered profiles to 433 million and went public in May 2011.

By all accounts, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and Weiner are getting along famously. "Long before Satya and I first sat down to talk about how we could work together, I had publicly shared my thoughts on how impressive his efforts were to rapidly transition Microsoft's strategy and culture," Weiner wrote in a letter to LinkedIn employees about the deal.

In his own e-mail to the LinkedIn staff, Nadella wrote, "From the moment I met Jeff I knew he was a special leader creating a special place at LinkedIn -- your sense of purpose is palpable."

Weiner is also close to Qi Lu, executive vice president of the Applications and Services Group at Microsoft. The two worked together at Yahoo.

An open question is how long Weiner will remain at Microsoft. His name has been bandied about as a potential replacement when Disney CEO Bob Iger retires. Asked directly about how long he plans to stay by Re/code's Kara Swisher this month, Weiner reportedly answered that he was staying put.

Posted by Scott Bekker on June 24, 2016 at 10:37 AM0 comments


Datto Ships SIRIS 3 Platform

Business continuity and data recovery specialist Datto rolled out its third generation of appliances, services and cloud solutions under the SIRIS brand this week during its DattoCon conference for MSPs in Nashville.

A major new element of the broad set of enhancements across the SIRIS 3 platform was the addition of an all-flash backup appliance called the SIRIS 3 X1. That device has a 1TB solid state drive, 16GB of RAM and local virtualization capabilities.

Other additions to the SIRIS 3 platform include new agents to support Mac and Linux endpoints, agentless backup for systems running VMware hypervisors, disk-less restores, Linux backup screenshot verification and hybrid virtualization, which was previously only available in the Datto ALTO product line. SIRIS 3 appliances are updated with 10Gb Ethernet interfaces and current Intel Xeon processors.

Also now included in the SIRIS platform is the ability to turn non-Datto backup and disaster recovery devices and other servers into Datto appliances. Previously branded GENISIS, that technology has been renamed as the SIRIS 3 Imaged service.

The SIRIS 3 software was available immediately for new appliance and service purchases. Datto promises a free upgrade to the SIRIS 3 software "shortly" for SIRIS 2 appliances, a generation that included the RCP 2016 Editor's Choice award-winning Datto SIRIS 2 Enterprise.

The company also unveiled a more robust Datto Device Management Portal; released a new partner pricing model for cloud storage called Infinite Cloud Retention; and reported thousands of sign-ups following the May 2016 launch of Datto Drive, its file sync and share solution that launched with a free one-year subscription with 1TB of cloud storage for unlimited users.

Posted by Scott Bekker on June 23, 2016 at 11:57 AM0 comments


SkyKick Releases App Syndication, APIs

SkyKick this week introduced two new distribution methods for its partner-focused, cloud management software.

The Seattle-area company already uses its Web site and some distribution relationships to sells its tools for helping partners migrate customers to Office 365 and manage and back up their cloud accounts once the customers are in the cloud.

Now, SkyKick is adding a syndication app that will allow partners to embed SkyKick's white-label migration and backup applications on their own Web sites. According to SkyKick, partners will be able to post the app with just a few lines of code in a process that takes less than an hour.

"I think this is going to be a huge boon for an MSP or a reseller who is doing high volume, and it will make their process more efficient. They can do online marketing, right to a landing page where customers can migrate, back up or manage themselves," says SkyKick Co-Founder/Co-CEO Todd Schwartz. Announced Wednesday, the syndication option will be available around the time of the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC), which starts July 11.

In addition, SkyKick is opening its APIs to allow developers to build custom cloud management applications or deeper integration with their own systems for migrating and managing cloud customers.

"They can customize the migration experience, the backup experience, however they want to, to fit their business model. This is for the larger end of the channel, [for companies that want] to make an investment in a scalable, unified platform," Schwartz said.

Posted by Scott Bekker on June 23, 2016 at 9:18 AM0 comments


ConnectWise Releases LabTech 11

ORLANDO, Fla. -- ConnectWise this week released a substantial upgrade to its LabTech remote monitoring and management (RMM) tool and previewed some integrations with the rest of the ConnectWise Business Suite, including a new unified ticketing system.

The announcements came during the Automation Nation show in Orlando attended by more than 500 ConnectWise partners.

Critical features of the new release, LabTech 11, include a redesigned user interface (UI), significant new patch management features and major scalability improvements.

The UI takes LabTech into the category of simplified design with substantial open space, similar to Google Apps or Office 365. Large tiles with placement that is customizable now show techs some of the key metrics that they used to have to drill down into the application to find.

"What [our users] are used to is a whole bunch of tabs with a whole lot of data. They would have to go mining for problems," said Brett Cheloff, LabTech general manager for ConnectWise, in an interview. "All these techs are looking at the same 10-15 data points. Now with the dashboard, all that data is already there."

[Click on image for larger view.] The overhauled dashboard in LabTech 11 surfaces common system metrics that technicians used to have to track down.

The UI changes in LabTech 11 are also a step toward a unified interface style that ConnectWise is working toward across its five major products, which also include the flagship ConnectWise professional services automation tool, Quosal, ScreenConnect and CloudConsole. Without committing to a ship date, Cheloff and ConnectWise CEO Arnie Bellini said more information on the unified interface would come at ConnectWise's big annual show, IT Nation, in November.

During his keynote, Cheloff also demoed a quick ticketing window that ConnectWise plans to put into pilot within about a month. The small window floated over the LabTech interface showing open tickets. When a help desk call came in, it started an immediate timer, and when the caller's name was entered, it pulled up the user's device information. The window features tight integration between LabTech, ConnectWise and the other Business Suite products, and should make it possible for techs to do most of their duties on one screen rather than a typical three-screen setup, Cheloff said.

With LabTech 11, which hit general availability on Tuesday, ConnectWise is also introducing a staged patch management feature that allows managed service providers (MSPs) to designate certain machines at each customer as pilots for new patches. That way, after testing a patch internally, an MSP can ship out the patch to all the pilot machines at customer sites. If unique problems emerge at individual customer sites, the broader deployment can be canceled. If the pilot goes smoothly, the patches are automatically deployed to all the servers after a set amount of time that the MSP controls.

"Scripting is our No. 1 thing. Automation, automation, automation."

Brett Cheloff, LabTech General Manager, ConnectWise

The other headline features in LabTech 11 have to do with scalability -- both in agent capacity and in the scripting engine. In version 10.5, ConnectWise for the first time allowed LabTech's database component to be deployed on a separate server. With version 11, LabTech is extending that separation to allow the Web server component to also be deployed on a separate server from the core application server. The roadmap calls for the ability to segment traffic so all agent traffic goes to one Web server and all techs hit a different Web server, Cheloff said.

LabTech 11's scripting engine is much more robust as well, a core improvement for a company that calls its partner conference Automation Nation. "Scripting is our No. 1 thing. Automation, automation, automation," Cheloff said. The old scripting agent could run 1,000 scripts at a time. The version 11 engine can handle 20,000, he said.

The 1,000-script limit was a gating factor for MSPs, but the 20,000-script limit should provide headroom for a while, Cheloff said.

"Our average size of a customer is about 1,000 to 1,500 agents deployed. You can run 1,000 scripts, even if you're deploying AV, say switching from eSET to Webroot. That would be a lot of scripts. Now you can change out your AV like that. Before, it would have slowed down or paused any other scripts they would have had. I don't think anyone's going to have anywhere near the [new] limits that we have set," he said.

Christian Vazquez, a service desk manager at Kennewick, Wash.-based Teknologize, said in an interview that the quick ticketing feature was the most interesting of several strong new features introduced at the conference.

"They're really trying to make our lives easier," Vazquez said after watching the ticketing demo. "Being able to start, stop, complete, clear and create and tickets will probably save [a] half-hour to an hour of multitasking a day [per technician]."

The integrated ticketing tool might also save employees on the billing side at his company two to three hours per week, Vazquez said. Integration with CloudConsole could also save Teknologize money by helping prevent Office 365 user cancellations from falling through the cracks. When techs handle a request from a customer to cancel one of its user accounts on Office 365, new techs handle their administrative responsibilities in shutting down that user but sometimes forget to tell the billing department, leaving Teknologize on the hook with Microsoft for paying the user's uncanceled subscription when the charge shows up at the end of the quarter, Vazquez explained.

Vazquez also was enthusiastic about the scalability of the scripting enhancements, which he said will be useful in script-testing scenarios. "Every iteration of the test takes time. I could spend an hour and only go through eight revisions. Hopefully, I can do a couple dozen changes now and not waste time," he said.

Posted by Scott Bekker on June 22, 2016 at 8:52 AM0 comments


How LinkedIn Stacks Up Against Other Microsoft Acquisitions

If successful, Microsoft's acquisition of LinkedIn for $26.2 billion would be the tech giant's highest-valued deal to date by a huge margin. The face value of the LinkedIn agreement is more than triple what Microsoft paid for the next biggest acquisition, Skype. The LinkedIn offer is about half the size of Microsoft's $44.6 billion bid in 2008 for Yahoo, but that deal ultimately did not go through.

Here are Microsoft's acquisitions worth $1 billion or more, ranked by their value at the time:

Rank Company Year Value
1 LinkedIn 2016 $26.2 billion
2 Skype 2011 $8.5 billion
3 Nokia (partial) 2013 $7.2 billion
4 aQuantive 2007 $6.3 billion
5 Mojang 2014 $2.5 billion
6 Fast Search & Transfer 2008 $1.9 billion
7 Visio Corp. 2000 $1.4 billion
8 Navision 2002 $1.3 billion
9 Yammer 2012 $1.2 billion

Related:

Posted by Scott Bekker on June 13, 2016 at 9:15 AM0 comments


BitTitan Raises $15 Million in Outside Funding

BitTitan, which sells a broad array of tools that help partners sell, onboard and maintain cloud services from Microsoft and others, has closed a $15 million Series A financing round, which will allow the company to boost its engineering and global sales efforts.

The 9-year-old Kirkland, Wash.-based company did not disclose the specific percentage stake that the investors led by San Diego-based growth equity firm TVC Capital were getting in the company or what the deal means for the overall valuation of BitTitan.

"It is a small percentage of the company, and we are adding one person to our board," said Barney Silver, vice president of finance for BitTitan, in a telephone interview about the funding round, which was announced Thursday. Steve Hamerslag, managing partner at TVC Capital, is the investor joining the board. In a statement, Hamerslag said BitTitan was TVC Capital's largest Series A funding to date. Tao Capital Partners of San Francisco also participated in the funding round.

This is the first outside funding BitTitan has taken since former Microsoft engineer Geeman Yip started the company in 2007, and Silver says the company's bootstrap identity and the fact that it is already profitable were major factors in BitTitan's ability to raise money even as the trend among technology investors is for them to fold their wallets shut.

"Being a business that's been around for a while and that has demonstrated that we weren't trying to figure out if we've got a product that works or not was super helpful to us," Silver said.

According to senior BitTitan executives, Yip determined that the opportunity in cloud generally was becoming bigger than BitTitan could continue to address in the organic-growth manner that it had previously operated. That was part of the reason for bringing Silver onboard late last year.

Silver said he's not sure that BitTitan will need future outside investments. "We are raising this money so we can accelerate growth. This may be all the money we ever need to raise," Silver said. "We met with lots of investors who were very interested to write us significantly bigger checks. Realistically, we couldn't deploy $50 or $60 million today. It would be too much to spend relative to our scale too quickly."

The growth of the company to date has been rapid. The company claims revenue increases between 50 percent to 100 percent in each of the last five years. A major push behind BitTitan's relatively new MSPComplete offerings has helped the company double its number of partners in the last year to more than 7,000 MSPs, systems integrators and distributors.

BitTitan, which has also doubled its staff in the last couple of years, will be hiring aggressively with the investment. "We've cashed the check and we are in the process of opening dozens of headcount as we speak," said Rocco Seyboth, vice president of products and marketing for BitTitan. "The two areas we are focusing on and how we're going to deploy the capital is accelerating the product roadmap -- hiring more engineers so we can build out software more quickly -- and the other is international expansion. While we are a global business, and we have sales around the world, we were doing it with a few people scattered around the globe."

Posted by Scott Bekker on June 09, 2016 at 10:18 AM0 comments


AWS Rolls Out Migration Competency

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) giant Amazon Web Services (AWS) delivered a key new element for its channel program this week with the formal rollout of the AWS Migration Competency.

Amazon announced that the migration competency was on the AWS Partner Network (APN) roadmap last October during the AWS Global Partner Summit in Las Vegas. The migration competency is about helping partners move applications or entire datacenter operations to the Amazon cloud.

"There is just a gigantic opportunity for SIs [systems integrators] to help enterprises with migration managed services," said AWS CEO Andy Jassy at the time.

An executive for one of the initial participants in the new competency program, Slalom Consulting, explained its significance in a video posted by AWS on Thursday.

"The new AWS competency for migrations is really important," said Joel Rosenberger, managing director of cloud technologies for Slalom Consulting. "A lot of people come in thinking about AWS, migrating to AWS. But what you find is there's complexity both around the organizational and knowing which technologies to apply when. And so I think having a competency around migration is a really important thing, and it's an assurance both to AWS customers and even ourselves that we are doing the right things by our customers."

In a blog post about the new competency, Kate Miller of the APN explained the point of the AWS Competency Program, which also includes DevOps, Big Data, Security and other competencies.

"Making sure the right AWS Partners are highlighted to customers and making it easy for customers to connect with these partners is the ultimate goal of the AWS Competency Program. Attaining an AWS Competency allows you, as an AWS Partner with specific expertise, to differentiate yourself to customers by showcasing this expertise," Miller wrote.

Amazon released five lists of launch partners who have earned the competency in various specializations:

  • Migration Delivery Partners, who can handle every stage of a migration, include 2nd Watch, Accenture, Classmethod Inc., ClearScale, Cloud Technology Partners, cloudpack, Cloudreach, Cognizant Technology Solutions, CorpInfo, CSC, FPT Software, Infosys, Logicworks, REAN Cloud, Serverworks, Slalom Consulting and Smartronix.

  • Migration Consulting Partners include Apps Associates, Aquilent, Datapipe, Flux7, Pythian and TriNimbus.

  • Partners who offer Migration Technology for Discovery & Planning include Atadata, Cloudamize and RISC Networks.

  • Migration Technology for Workload Mobility Partners are Racemi, CloudEndure and Atadata.

  • Migration Technology for Application Profiling Partners are New Relic, AppDynamics and Dynatrace Ruxit.

Posted by Scott Bekker on June 09, 2016 at 12:39 PM0 comments


SolarWinds N-able, LOGICnow Combine To Form SolarWinds MSP

In a deal that combines two of the biggest players in the managed service provider (MSP) tools market, SolarWinds has bought LOGICnow and will combine their product lines into a unit called SolarWinds MSP, the companies said Wednesday.

SolarWinds, an IT management software company that bought its way into the MSP market with the acquisition of N-able Technologies in 2013, positioned the new combination as adding LOGICnow's cloud capabilities and MSP-focused data analytics to SolarWinds' existing remote monitoring and management (RMM) and other MSP-focused technologies.

"SolarWinds is committed to the growing MSP market and has realized great success through the acquisition of N-able, making the acquisition of LOGICnow a natural next step for us," said Kevin B. Thompson, president and CEO of SolarWinds, in a statement.

"SolarWinds MSP, combining the capabilities of LOGICnow and SolarWinds N-able, will offer MSPs a complete set of IT service management solutions via the cloud and on-premises delivery models. SolarWinds MSP gives them everything they need to acquire and retain profitable clients, deliver outstanding levels of service, and maximize their internal efficiency through standardization of their toolsets and the use of automation," Thompson said.

SolarWinds was a public company when it bought N-able. However, the company went private last year when private equity technology investment firms Silver Lake Partners and Thomas Bravo bought SolarWinds for about $4.5 billion in cash. What SolarWinds paid for LOGICnow was not disclosed.

[Editor's Note: The original blog entry posted on Wednesday, June 1, has been updated from here on based on a telephone interview Thursday, June 2, with SolarWinds MSP Managing Director Alistair Forbes.]

According to the companies, SolarWinds MSP will have a huge base of MSP customers worldwide -- 18,000 MSP companies with 200,000 engineers managing more than 5 million end points and 1 million mailboxes. About 5,000 of those MSPs are SolarWinds customers, with the rest coming from LOGICnow.

The companies identified new titles for a few senior LOGICnow executives within the SolarWinds MSP organization. LOGICnow CEO Walter Scott is now executive vice president for SolarWinds MSP, reporting to Thompson. LOGICnow General Manager Alistair Forbes and JP Jauvin, who ran the SolarWinds N-able business, each now hold the title of managing director at SolarWinds MSP, reporting to Scott.

Competitors were already field testing the messaging that they'll be honing in the coming months as they attempt to exploit any uncertainty within the SolarWinds MSP customer base. "Their customers should be concerned about this M&A event not only because of the massive debt that SolarWinds is taking on in order to fund it -- which in itself will require massive cuts in R&D and support to service it -- but the uncertainty around which product will survive when they merge the two product lines," said Kaseya CEO Fred Voccola in a statement e-mailed to reporters shortly after the deal was announced.

In an interview the morning after the acquisition, SolarWinds' Forbes acknowledged that there are overlaps in components of the two companies' MSP tool platforms. However, he made a clear commitment that not only would neither platform be discontinued, but that development would continue on both product lines.

"Both platforms are at the heart of many MSPs. We are acutely aware of the fact that the products that we're providing are used to run their businesses. Any changes are going to be incremental and additive -- taking technology from one platform and adding it into the other platform," Forbes said. "For us to say that we're going to retire one of them would be absolutely contrary to what we're doing here."

Instead, he emphasized new opportunities for both groups of MSPs, such as the ability for an MSP using N-central to offer MAX Backup and Disaster Recovery for customers.

Geographically, the combination gives SolarWinds a much stronger presence in Germany, France and Italy due to LOGICnow's distribution relationships. Looking at the ability to service different-sized MSPs, Forbes said, "We're now the only company in the market that has the ability to go from the smallest MSPs of two to three people to some of the very biggest [telcos]," Forbes said. He said smaller partners will tend to be drawn to the LOGICnow cloud products, while the biggest MSPs use on-premise-based N-central products.

Forbes also pointed to the headcount numbers for the combined unit as a source of reassurance for SolarWinds and LOGICnow partners. About 450 employees from LOGICnow will join the 300 employees of the SolarWinds N-able unit, to create a SolarWinds MSP business that is 750 employees strong. Executives are "still looking at redundancies" in administrative areas, Forbes said, but he didn't expect those to significantly affect the size of the unit. A key takeaway for MSPs, Forbes argued, is that "we have something like 400 engineers in R&D now within the SolarWinds MSP business."

On a similar note, Forbes contends that LOGICnow partners shouldn't be concerned that the SolarWinds MSP effort might get lost in the larger agenda of the IT-focused SolarWinds. SolarWinds MSP is between a third and a quarter of the overall SolarWinds business, he said: "We're a very important part of SolarWinds."

Posted by Scott Bekker on June 01, 2016 at 11:35 AM0 comments