Cell Phones for Cash

December is the busiest season for cell phone sales: According to mobile research firm M:Metrics, an estimated 12 percent of U.S. consumers will buy new phones during the month.

If you have a collection of old cell phones that are just taking up space in your home, you might consider swapping them for some cash. It might make even more sense if you're an IT manager responsible for acquiring, managing and disposing of mobile devices in your organization.

You won't make much, but companies like Flipswap and Cell For Cash will actually pay you for your old phone, which they then resell. Flipswap offers its service to consumers on its site but also sells its software to wireless distributors like Parrot Cellular and online phone retailer Wirefly. Flipswap's pricing algorithms offer a price for your phones by taking into account your phone's make and model, condition and market demand.

Do you have old cell phones hanging around? What do you do with them? Dial me in at [email protected].

Posted by Peter Varhol on December 11, 2007 at 11:57 AM


Featured

  • Windows Autopilot for HoloLens 2 Hits Preview

    Windows Autopilot, Microsoft's PC self-provisioning program, is now being tested for use with the company's mixed-reality headset, the HoloLens 2.

  • Signs Point to Microsoft Charging for Use of APIs

    There are indications that Microsoft is mulling charging customers for software that uses its application programming interfaces.

  • The 2020 Microsoft Product Roadmap

    From the next major update to Windows 10 to the next generations of .NET and PowerShell, here's what's on tap from Microsoft this year.

  • Microsoft Extends Azure Hybrid Benefit Licensing to Linux

    Microsoft has expanded its Azure Hybrid Benefit licensing program to include Linux servers, particularly Red Hat Enterprise Linux or SUSE Linux Enterprise servers.