IBM Bridges Server Consolidation and Carbon Markets

Last week, IBM announced a program that will make it possible for its customers to document server energy savings and trade them on one of the emerging carbon trading markets.

Today, you can consolidate applications running on multiple servers onto a mainframe, have the energy savings documented as carbon credits, then trade those carbon credits for cash or other consideration on a carbon trading market. The certificates can be issued for each year of the life of the project.

The program is currently available only for IBM's mainframes, but the company plans to extend it to all of its server lines and as storage systems. This provides flexibility well beyond the mainframe, which few of us are likely to upgrade to.

Does documenting and trading carbon credits make server consolidation more attractive to you? Send me your thoughts to pvarhol@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Peter Varhol on November 06, 2007 at 11:57 AM


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