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Saving Microsoft? Humbug!

I used to hate Wired magazine for its design (lesson here is to never give your art director meth and an unlimited library of fonts). Eventually, the design settled down and it seemed to lose its "We're smarter than you" attitude. The mag is now pretty darn good.

But all is not perfect in Wired-land -- and perhaps it can take some of the money it saved on all those fonts to hire some better headline writers. My beef is with a recent cover story about Ray Ozzie: "Can This Man Save Microsoft?" Given that I follow Redmond's finances -- which seem to set a new record each and every quarter -- I was confused by the premise.

So I settled in to read just why Microsoft was in such dire straits. A couple thousand words into the story, I knew all about Ozzie's college education, white hair and shyness...but I had no clue if or why Microsoft was in trouble.

Microsoft has challenges, but it owns messaging, owns the desktop, owns more than half of the development market, and has a big chunk of the Web. It has also announced exactly how all of this can move to Web -- and has production and beta software to prove it. I wish I owned a company that was in as rough a shape as Microsoft!

Posted by Doug Barney on December 16, 2008


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