Google Tests New Approach to Mapping

Google has introduced a new service that enables mobile phone users to determine their approximate location and retrieve mapping information without the use of GPS.

This service, currently being tested, requires Google-provided software to be installed on the phone. Because it doesn't use GPS (rather, it most likely identifies the location and bearing of the receiving cell tower), its margin of error is going to be significantly higher. However, Google claims that there will be enough data to provide neighborhood-level information.

Like most end user services from the search giant, this location service is free. Google is likely planning on selling ads delivered through the service.

Do you think Google already knows too much about you? How about your location? Search me out and let me know at pvarhol@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Peter Varhol on December 04, 2007 at 11:57 AM


Featured

  • Coronavirus Shelter-in-Place Rules Boosting Microsoft Services

    Microsoft recently shared some statistics on the growth of its services since widespread "shelter-in-place" mandates due to novel coronavirus concerns have taken effect.

  • The 2020 Microsoft Product Roadmap

    From the next major update to Windows 10 to the next generations of .NET and PowerShell, here's what's on tap from Microsoft this year.

  • 2020 Microsoft Conference Calendar: For Partners, IT Pros and Developers

    Here's your guide to all the IT training sessions, partner meet-ups and annual Microsoft conferences you won't want to miss. (Now updated with COVID-19-related event changes.)

  • Microsoft Bolsters Its 5G Chops with Affirmed Networks Acquisition

    Microsoft has acquired Affirmed Networks, buttressing its software-defined networking services just as mobile operators start rolling out 5G wireless technologies.

RCP Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.