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MSP Evangelist Predicts New Wave of Managed Services

Over the last decade, Charles Weaver, president of MSP Alliance has been slowly but surely trying to win over traditional break-fix companies on the managed services model.

The pitch was and still is simple, roll off project-based implementation and reboot-crescent-wrench IT work and create an avenue for recurring revenue and repeat customers.

It's obvious that the pitch has worked. There are now thousands of managed service concerns, so much so that some have began to rank MSPs by revenue.

Now Weaver has predicted a new wave of managed services based on the growth of systems integration and telephony work for IT service companies.

"These are companies who were relatively well insulated during 2009 and were not as deeply affected by the bleed off of hardware/project revenues but can still read the tea leaves and know that a change must come," Weaver wrote in a recent blog post.

These new-wave companies, according to Weaver, are mainly VARs who want to begin to make their client projects more permanent and manage the network and systems projects that they set up.

Network administration, business continuity, and cloud computing architecture are some of the areas that the companies Weaver mentioned are looking to rapidly enter.

Posted by Jabulani Leffall on August 04, 2010 at 11:57 AM


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