Barney's Blog

Blog archive

Microsoft Licensing Purposely Hard

It's nice sometimes to be validated. After researching two cover stories about Microsoft licensing, I decided that Microsoft made licensing hard on purpose. The more confused customers are, the more power Redmond sales reps have.

Now the esteemed analyst firm Directions on Microsoft agrees. In a recent article, the group (made up largely of ex-Microsoft execs) clearly believes Microsoft builds in this complexity as a negotiating tactic. The idea is IT gets so frustrated; it just pays the bill rather than unravel the tangle of terms and conditions.

There's help, and my two articles are a good place to start. My research started with Microsoft's own materials, which are largely unfathomable. Then I went to customers. But I didn't really start to get it until I talked with Scott Braden, in my opinion the No. 1 expert on Redmond licensing.

Here are a few links that can hopefully help:

Do you have any tips for negotiating with Microsoft or cases where you've been burned? Send both or either to [email protected]

Posted by Doug Barney on September 11, 2009 at 11:53 AM


Featured

  • White Cloud Graphic

    Microsoft Releases Windows 365, Its New Desktop-as-a-Service Solution

    Windows 365 is now available for use by organizations in production environments, Microsoft announced on Monday.

  • The 2021 Microsoft Product Roadmap

    From Windows 10X to the next generation of Microsoft's application server products, here are the product milestones coming down the pipeline in 2021.

  • Microsoft Partner Nerdio Talks Windows 365 and Cloud PC

    Microsoft's upcoming desktop-as-a-service offering is "nothing but opportunity" for partners, according to Vadim Vladimirskiy, Nerdio's founder and CEO.

  • The Future of Windows Server Includes Less Frequent Updates

    Microsoft is ending its practice of issuing semiannual channel updates for Window Server editions, turning instead to long-term servicing channel updates.