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Open Source Feedback

The Slashdotters have struck again. The popular discussion site (what is it about the Internet that releases inhibitions faster than a double Grey Goose martini?) picked up our cover story about Microsoft's fledgling effort to work with the open source community.

We praised Redmond for its efforts to build quasi-open products and its more serious stab at interoperating with the open community.

As you might expect, zealots (God bless 'em) came out of the proverbial woodwork with comments.

I was plumb excited by the sheer volume of feedback, and even more pleased by the passion. One of my favorites was W. Anderson arguing that Redmond magazine editors are "inexperienced in professional journalism" and should "learn to report stories factually."

Hey, W. My folks have lost more hair than a grizzly's chest and are saving up for liposuction, dentures and hip replacements. They might not be experienced journalists but they sure are creaky!

Scroll to the bottom for the good stuff.

While the open source posts were a gas, they were not nearly as much fun as when Fark made fun of one of Redmond magazine's maiden issues.

Posted by Doug Barney on March 26, 2007 at 11:52 AM


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