News

Apple Recalls 1.8 Million Sony Batteries

Apple Computer Inc. on Thursday recalled 1.8 million Sony-built laptop batteries that could overheat and catch fire.

Apple Computer Inc. on Thursday recalled 1.8 million Sony-built laptop batteries that could overheat and catch fire.

Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple has received nine reports of batteries overheating, including two consumers who received minor burns after handling overheated computers. Apple has also received reports of minor property damage, but no serious injuries have been reported.

Apple's recall comes two weeks after Dell Inc.'s recall of 4.1 million faulty laptop batteries also made by Sony --the largest electronics recall in the Consumer Product Safety Commission's history.

Apple's recall covers 1.1 million lithium-ion batteries in the 12-inch iBook G4, 12-inch PowerBook G4 and 15-inch PowerBook G4 laptops sold in the United States from October 2003 through August 2006. It also covers an additional 700,000 laptops sold abroad, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Dell's recall affected about 14 percent of the Latitude, Inspiron, XPS and Precision notebooks sold between April 1, 2004, and July 18 of this year.

Apple is asking consumers to check this Web site to determine whether they have a recalled battery.

Featured

  • Microsoft Adds Privileged Identity Management Delegation to Azure Lighthouse

    The commercial release of Privileged Identity Management (PIM)-enabled Azure Lighthouse delegations is now available, Microsoft on Monday announced.

  • Microsoft Commercially Releases Entra Workload Identities

    Microsoft announced on Monday that its Entra Workload Identities service is now available as a commercial product offering, having reached the "general availability" stage.

  • The 2022 Microsoft Product Roadmap

    Microsoft has a lot in the docket for 2022, including new products like SQL Server 2022, Exchange Subscription Edition and Visual Studio 2022 for Mac.

  • OpenSSF Adopts Microsoft Open Source Software Security Guidelines

    The Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) announced on Wednesday that it has adopted the Secure Supply Chain Consumption Framework (S2C2F) for ensuring the secure use of open source software (OSS) by developers.