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MCP Exam Second-Shot Promo Nears End

The second coming of Microsoft's MCP exam retake promotion is coming to an end on August 31, 2005.

Microsoft's "Second-Shot Offer" allows anyone taking and failing an MCP exam to retake that exam. According to the offer posted on the MCP site, candidates can retake any IT Professional or Developer exam only once, but the retake can be applied to as many exams as a candidate can take until the offer ends.

Candidates who want to take advantage of the offer must first register for it. To read more details on the retake offer and the FAQ, go to http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/offers/2ndshot/.

The offer is available worldwide, but it can't be combined with any other exam offer that requires a promotional code, such as the MCP 2-for-1 exam offer or special offers in India.

Microsoft offers the same retake promotion for candidates planning to take any Microsoft Partner Competency and Microsoft Business Solutions exams; that promotion also ends August 31. See "Second-Shot for MBS Exams" at http://mcpmag.com/news/article.asp?EditorialsID=784 for more information.

About the Author

Michael Domingo has held several positions at 1105 Media, and is currently the editor in chief of Visual Studio Magazine.

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