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VMware’s Multi-core Strategy: Per-CPU Pricing

VMware announced this week it will price its products per CPU and not per core, assuring users that they will not be penalized for moving to emerging multi-core processors.

The move follows Microsoft which had announced it would only charge per CPU, also known as “per socket,” last fall. Intel said earlier this week that it expects that more than 85 percent of its server CPU shipments by the end of 2006 will be multi-core chips.

Additionally, VMware clarified its plans for supporting multi-core processors in its products. VMware GSX Server 3.2, which shipped last month, provides support for dual-core systems. Versions of VMware’s Workstation and ACE products released earlier this year came with support for dual-core processors.

VMware says that the next releases of its data center products, ESX Server and VirtualCenter, will complete the delivery of support for dual-core systems across the company’s server product line.

About the Author

Stuart J. Johnston has covered technology, especially Microsoft, since February 1988 for InfoWorld, Computerworld, Information Week, and PC World, as well as for Enterprise Developer, XML & Web Services, and .NET magazines.

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