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Windows Server 2003 SP1, 64-bit Extended Editions Slip to 2005

Microsoft has given up on delivering Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1, Windows Server 2003 for 64-bit Extended Systems and Windows XP 64-bit for 64-bit Extended Systems this year.

In a statement released to reporters Tuesday afternoon, Microsoft formally pushed back the release date for Windows Server 2003 SP 1, Windows Server 2003 64-bit Extended Systems and Windows XP 64-bit for 64-bit Extended Systems into the first half of 2005.

Both SP1 and the 64-bit server editions had most recently been scheduled for release in late 2004. Originally, both had been planned for a late 2003 release.

Like Windows XP Service Pack 2, which is scheduled to be finished next month, Windows Server 2003 SP1 is part of Microsoft's "Springboard" initiative for further securing shipping products. Many of the enhancements coming in SP1 for the server build on changes engineered into SP2 for the client. That client service pack has slipped several times, apparently affecting the schedule for the server patch and requiring additional testing.

The delay cascades into the 64-bit extended systems versions, which support AMD and Intel processors using 64-bit extensions to x86-based processors.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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