Special Report on Clustering

Clustering is a linchpin of Microsoft's enterprise computing strategy. To some degree with "scale-up" and to a large extent with "scale-out," clustering is extremely important to Microsoft's ability to meet large customers' needs for scalability and high availability.

With Windows' practical limitation of eight-processor machines and reputation for instability, Microsoft's clustering technologies and those of its third-party partners and partner/competitors are requirements for running Windows in the enterprise.

In this special report, ENT looks at the state of the art in clustering of Microsoft systems.

Microsoft Puts Reference Customer Forward for SQL Cluster
Microsoft has gone public with a production customer using its Distributed Partition Views technology in SQL Server 2000. (more)

High-Availability Clustering Market Shrinks
The once vibrant high-availability software market for the Windows NT platform is now down to Microsoft and a handful of other companies. (more)

Clustered Grids Make Their Way Into the Enterprise
IT organizations are beginning to exploit the latent computing capabilities of standard PCs throughout the enterprise for high-end computing. (more)

ENT's Guide to Microsoft Clustering Technologies
Over the last several years, Microsoft has greatly expanded its list of technologies that fit under the umbrella term "clustering." Here's an overview of some of the most prominent Microsoft clustering technologies.(more)

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.