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Intel Introduces Hardware-Based Encryption

Encryption can play a vital role in a secure network, but algorithms can tax processor power, making encrypted networking extremely slow. In response to this, Intel Corp. released yesterday their family of PRO/100 S Security adapters.

The hardware adapters provide an encryption co-processor that performs encryption tasks, allowing the motherboard to perform normally. The solution, which consists of both server and client components, encrypts data moving across a secure network. Both components are necessary to send and receive encrypted data.

PRO/100 S will be available both as an upgrade and integrated into OEM machines.

Software encryption can make a network secure, but its use can diminish performance. This new hardware can make the encryption nearly invisible. The new adapters employ the nascent IPSec standard and agreed standard for networking security, optimized for Windows 2000.

Contact Intel, (408) 765-8080, www.intel.com.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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