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Microsoft Licenses FastLane's Consolidation Software

FastLane Technologies Inc. today licensed another of its technologies to Microsoft to ease the migration from Windows NT to Windows 2000. The latest FastLane technology licensed will enable administrators to migrate files from Novell's NetWare to the Windows 2000 Server operating system.

The technology Microsoft is licensing is based on FastLane DM/Consolidator, which enables administrators to move file data to Windows 2000 while preserving directory structures and security permissions. FastLane DM/Consolidator also allows users to maintain access to their data during the migration process.

Microsoft will incorporate the FastLane technology in the Microsoft File Migration Utility (MSFMU) component of Services for NetWare 5, which is expected to be available shortly after the launch of Windows 2000 in February. MSFMU can assign an appropriate security access setting in Windows 2000 automatically to each file it moves.

FastLane (www.fastlanetech.com) and other directory migration players Mission Critical Software (www.missioncritical.com), Entevo Corp. (www.entevo.com) and Aelita Software (www.aelita.com) have been heavily gearing up for the Feb. 17 release date for Windows 2000. -- Isaac Slepner

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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