Microsoft's Hypervisor Goes Solo

Earlier this week, Microsoft announced plans to sell its virtualization technology on its own, a reversal of its earlier plans. While most people will still probably get Microsoft's hypervisor bundled with Windows Server 2008, selling it separately will let them use it on servers that may be running Linux or something other than Windows.

Microsoft's hypervisor virtualization layer has been a widely anticipated component of Windows Server 2008. Formerly code-named Viridian, it's now called Hyper-V. Whether bundled with the Standard, Enterprise or Datacenter versions of Windows Server 2008, or by itself, Microsoft's Hyper-V will sell for $28.

While Microsoft may not make a ton of money selling Hyper-V on its own at $28 a pop, doing so is an important strategic move. The ability to run Hyper-V on non-Windows Server 2008 servers could help Microsoft do battle in the increasingly competitive arena of virtualization.

How do you virtualize? Are you standardized on Microsoft's tools? VMware? Citrix? Something else? Let me know at llow@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Lafe Low on November 14, 2007 at 11:57 AM


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