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.NET Source: Look But Don't Touch!

Microsoft is releasing a whole heap of .NET 3.5 source code. Does this mean you can create your own .NET distribution? Not bloody likely. In this clear step in the right direction, Microsoft is allowing developers to look at .NET source code to help understand how it works and where problems may lie. But changing the code is still very much a no-no.

I can possibly see Microsoft's point here. In open source, when you modify code, you're either on your own or the community supports you. In the case of .NET, should it be Microsoft's responsibility to help when you've completely trashed .NET with your spaghetti code?

What would you do about open source if you ran Microsoft? Tell us all at [email protected].

Posted by Doug Barney on October 08, 2007 at 11:52 AM


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