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Dilbert Stole a Ziggy (I Mean, a Barney)!

If you're a fan of Seinfeld (or former fan, after Michael Richards' Tourette's-like outburst), you'll remember the episode where Elaine got a cartoon published in the New Yorker. Unfortunately for her, the idea was lifted subconsciously from a Ziggy.

Well, Scott Adams of Dilbert fame did the very same thing to yours truly. My October 2006 Redmond column was entitled "Bill for President."

In late November, Adams had the exact same brilliant idea which he wrote up with great fanfare on his blog.

Now, media all over the world are jumping on this bandwagon, and giving Adams all the credit. Hey, aren't he and his awful cartoon famous enough already?

The wheels really started to turn when Paul McNamara, a former employee of mine at Network World, picked up on the Adams post.

Then Slashdot, which was offered my column for its readers to make fun of, promoted the "Adams" idea.

Now, I'm calling on loyal Redmond readers from across the globe to right this grievous wrong. Let these bloggers, pundits and hack cartoonists know where the idea really came from -- a hack blogger and pundit from Redmond magazine!

For the real story, go to a source you can really trust.

Posted by Doug Barney on December 05, 2006 at 11:52 AM


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