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Microsoft No. 49 on Fortune 500

Microsoft is America's 49th largest corporation, dropping one spot from a year ago in the Fortune 500 list.

Microsoft is America's 49th largest corporation, dropping one spot from a year ago in the Fortune 500 list. Microsoft is the top-ranked software company in the list, with revenues of more than $44 billion. Revenues were up 11.3 percent over last year, when it ranked No. 48, and profits were up 2.8 percent from 2006.

Several IT-related companies ranked above Microsoft, but none are primarily software companies. Hewlett-Packard headed the list, coming in at No. 14 with $91.6 billion in revenues; IBM, right behind at No. 15 with $91.4 billion; and Dell placed 34th, at $57 billion.

Other notable companies following Microsoft include Intel, No. 62 on the list with $35.3 billion; No. 77 Cisco, $28.4 billion; No. 121 Apple, $19.3 billion. Interestingly, no other software company cracked the top 150. Oracle came in at No. 167, with $14.3 billion, and after that the drop is precipitous, with Symantec and Computer Associates (CA) earning spots No. 515 and 547, respectively.

The complete list can be found here.

About the Author

Keith Ward is the editor in chief of Virtualization & Cloud Review. Follow him on Twitter @VirtReviewKeith.

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