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Teen MCSE, Medical Microchip Pioneer, Succumbs

Derek Jacobs, among youngest in nation to achieve MCSE status when he was 12, killed in motorcycle accident.

(Boca Raton, Fla.) A teen engineering prodigy who gained national attention in 2002 when he and his family received identification chip implants on live television was killed in a motorcycle accident, authorities said.

Derek Jacobs, 18, lost control of his motorcycle early Saturday and crashed into a guardrail and a pole, the Palm Beach County sheriff's office said. He was wearing a helmet.

"It was just a crazy accident of a bump or something, and he was catapulted," said his mother, Leslie Jacobs. "He had, of course, potential, because he was brilliant, and he was just a wonderful son. He wanted to make a difference in the world."

Derek was set to get his engineering degree this year after only two years at Florida International University. He wanted to be a neurosurgeon, his mother said.

At age 12, Derek became a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer.

Two years later, he and his family had identity chips implanted on live television. They were the first family to get VeriChip IDs, made by Applied Digital Solutions.

Derek pushed his parents to look into the chips as a way to help store medical information for his father, who suffered a host of health problems, including cancer.

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