News

IBM Blades Cut SMP Down to Size

IBM Corp. will begin shipping four-way server blades in February that will allow consolidation-minded organizations to jam 28 Intel Xeon MP processors into 7U of rack space, the company said this week.

Up to seven of the four-processor blades slide vertically into a 7U IBM eServer BladeCenter chassis. IBM has not yet disclosed the pricing for the individual blades, which are called the IBM eServer BladeCenter HS40. A lower-end model supporting up to two processors, the HS20, starts at $2,780 with a 2.8-GHz Intel Xeon processor.

IBM bills the HS40 as the smallest four-way on the market, and has HP in its crosshairs. Big Blue compares its HS40 blades against an HP four-way blade offering that requires 9U of rack space for two four-processor blades.

Early customers of the HS40 include the Atlanta-based ISP, Interland.

Also on Wednesday, IBM added a new server to its Intel-based server line. The new IBM eServer xSeries 365 is a four-processor Intel Xeon MP server design with a 3U rack profile. With six internal hard disk drives, its internal storage capacity tops out at 876 GB.

The xSeries 365 is available immediately starting at $7,040.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

Featured

  • The 2021 Microsoft Product Roadmap

    From Windows 10X to the next generation of Microsoft's application server products, here are the product milestones coming down the pipeline in 2021.

  • After High-Profile Attacks, Biden Calls for Better Software Security

    Recent high-profile security attacks have prompted the Biden administration to issue an executive order aiming to tighten software security practices across the board.

  • With Hybrid Networks on Rise, Microsoft Touts Zero Trust Security

    Hybrid networks, which combine use of cloud services with on-premises software, require a "zero trust" security approach, Microsoft said this week.

  • Feds Advise Orgs on How To Block Ransomware Amid Colonial Pipeline Attack

    A recent ransomware attack on a U.S. fuel pipeline company has put a spotlight on how "critical infrastructure" organizations can prevent similar attacks.