Azure Is a 2019 Partner Priority: Get Some Help from Our Webcast

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When it comes to 2019 priorities, few are as important for Microsoft partners as fleshing out an Azure strategy.

Even for partners who have embraced the cloud on the Office 365 side, the margins have been tightening lately, and we seem to be on (or approaching) the backside of the adoption curve. To be sure, there's a lot of opportunity left in Office 365, but we may be starting to see the beginning of the end of the gold rush phase.

That said, there are other gold rushes in the Microsoft cloud, and they're potentially much bigger than Office 365. The one that Microsoft is most outspoken about is Azure, with its endless possibilities for scale, flexibility and integration of new technologies like Internet of Things (IoT), blockchain and artificial intelligence (AI).

It can be relatively intimidating for partners who haven't done a lot with Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) or Platform as a Service (PaaS) to know where to start or how to expand. I've seen a lot of partners push off really digging into Azure, but we're getting close to crunch time on this one.

That's why I'm really looking forward to a webcast on Monday, Dec. 17, at 11 a.m. PST/2 p.m. ET with Bryan Hamilton of Arrow Cloud and Woody Walton of Microsoft. We'll be talking about the nuts and bolts of the Azure opportunity for partners.

Arrow specializes in datacenter migrations. You may think of them as a distribution and Cloud Solution Provider (CSP) only for partners working with enterprise-scale datacenter migrations. But they've got a lot of resources and help for smaller, even much smaller, partners who are looking to expand their Azure business.

I hope you'll join us for the conversation about great resources available for partners around Azure from both Microsoft and Arrow. We'll hit on some of the high-end capabilities, certainly, but we'll dedicate a lot of the conversation to the challenges and opportunities in Azure for smaller and startup engagements with Azure, as well. Be sure to tune in live so you can get your questions answered in real-time.

Registration is here.

Posted by Scott Bekker on December 14, 2018 at 8:31 AM0 comments


Year of Milestones for Current and Former Microsoft Channel Execs

As 2018 draws to a close, it's been a year of milestones for a lot of the Microsoft channel executives who have appeared in the pages of Redmond Channel Partner magazine or in the browser on RCPmag.com since 2005.

Margo Day Retires
Margo Day was an early supporter of RCP, contributing a "Microsoft View" column for our inaugural July 2005 issue and regularly making herself available for interviews in her then-role as vice president of the U.S. Partner Group at Microsoft. She stopped writing the column in the summer of 2006 when a Microsoft reorganization shifted her to vice president of the U.S. West Region for Microsoft's Small and Midmarket Solutions & Partners unit.

After five years in that role, Day took a year leave to raise funds and awareness for the Kenya Child Protection Through Education Project of an organization called World Vision, and then returned to Microsoft in 2012 as vice president for U.S. Education.

On Sept. 28, Day retired from Microsoft with plans to dedicate herself fully to the Kenya project. To that point, she had visited Kenya 11 times, focusing on the West Pokot area, and on working through education to change community attitudes toward child brides and female genital mutilation/cutting (FGMC/C).

As befits a Microsoft executive, Day's hope is to scale the project to many more areas of the country.

"World Vision has a dream to build on the success of the program in West Pokot and take it to other FGM/C and child marriage hot spots in Kenya where they work to ultimately end these retrogressive practices so that every child, girl and boy, can live life in all its fullness. I want to lean in to help them do just that. It's why I retired," Day wrote in a blog post.

Jenni Flinders Becomes VMware Channel Chief
Another longtime Microsoft channel executive, Jenni Flinders, took on the top channel job at VMware Inc. in April.

Flinders, who spoke regularly with RCP and contributed several times to the start-of-year Marching Orders features, left Microsoft in 2015 after a career that included general manager roles within the Worldwide Partner Group and a lengthy term as vice president of the U.S. Partner Group. Between Microsoft and VMware, Flinders advised clients on channel strategy as CEO of the Daarlandt Partners consulting practice.

Flinders' official title is vice president of Worldwide Channels at VMware. Unofficially, she's worldwide channel chief.

Gavriella Schuster Takes a Board Seat
Microsoft's worldwide channel chief, Gavriella Schuster, added a strategic board seat to her duties in 2018. Schuster's official title at Microsoft is corporate vice president, One Commercial Partner at Microsoft, which is the top channel role at the company.

In October, Chinasoft International Ltd. announced that Schuster was joining the company's board of directors. The appointment is a signal of the strategic importance to Microsoft of Chinasoft, which bills itself as one of the largest IT services firms in China. Microsoft is the second-largest institutional owner of the 18-year-old company, and the seat makes Schuster Redmond's key ambassador to Chinasoft.

In a statement, Chinasoft CEO Dr. Yuhong Chen said, "We are quickly expanding our Microsoft business, especially around digital workplace and the cloud, and her deep knowledge of the Microsoft ecosystem and her relationships will be invaluable as we expand our presence around the world."

Chinasoft positioned Schuster's seat on the board as bolstering its recent expansion into Latin America, India and Malaysia. Catapult Systems is Chinasoft's U.S. subsidiary.

Eric Martorano Becomes a CEO
Eric Martorano was a high-profile executive for Microsoft from 2008 to 2016, when he was a general manager for U.S. Partner Sales with responsibility for $17 billion in revenues. He left Microsoft to become chief revenue officer at Intermedia, a position that kept him in view of Microsoft partners, many of whom are also Intermedia partners.

In late October, Martorano was named CEO and a board member of Accordo Group. The New Zealand-based company provides software and services that leverage business analytics and data science to help SMB customers optimize their software utilization and productivity.

Vince Menzione Moves to Blackbaud
For the last two years, former Microsoft channel executive Vince Menzione has hosted an informative podcast that's been a gem for Microsoft partners. Menzione, one of those indefatigable mentoring types, drew on a well-earned reservoir of goodwill among current senior Microsoft channel executives and many partners to land great interviews for his podcast. The Microsoft execs were willing to talk publicly on Menzione's "Ultimate Guide to Partnering" about a lot of things that they normally kept under wraps.

In September, Menzione -- who, like Martorano, was also a general manager in the Microsoft channel from 2008 to 2016 -- took on a full-time role with Blackbaud as vice president of Global Strategic Alliances. Based in South Carolina, Blackbaud provides cloud software and services for what it calls the "social good community" -- nonprofits, foundations, education institutions, health care institutions and the like.

Ron Huddleston (1973-2018)
As regular readers of RCP are aware, sadly no recap of the milestones of once and former Microsoft channel execs would be complete without mentioning the death of Ron Huddleston. The former Oracle, Salesforce and Microsoft executive died Sept. 28 at age 45.

His brief, but high-profile, tenure at Microsoft spanned from mid-2016 through December 2017, and included about 11 months as corporate vice president of the newly formed One Commercial Partner organization.

Huddleston joined Twilio in February of this year as chief partners officer, and oversaw the creation of a new partner program for the fast-growing cloud communications platform company in June.

Posted by Scott Bekker on December 14, 2018 at 11:40 AM0 comments


Server Market Hits Record High, Thanks to Cloud

Server sales are booming, researchers at IDC reported Tuesday night, with the third quarter recording the highest total revenue in a single quarter for servers ever.

For those of you looking around at much emptier server rooms than you might remember from a decade ago -- before the financial crisis and other factors pushed the computer hardware market sideways -- it's clearly not the same. As they say, the cloud is just someone else's datacenter, and those someone elses are loading up on hardware.

By the numbers, the server market soared year over year in the third quarter by 38 percent in revenues to $23.4 billion and by 18 percent in shipments to 3.2 million units.

It's the fifth consecutive quarter of double-digit revenue growth, according to IDC.

"The worldwide server market once again generated strong revenue and unit shipment growth due to an ongoing enterprise refresh cycle and continued demand from cloud service providers," said Sebastian Lagana, research manager for Infrastructure Platforms and Technologies at IDC, in a statement. "Enterprise infrastructure requirements from resource intensive next-generation applications support increasingly rich configurations, ensuring average selling prices (ASPs) remain elevated against the year-ago quarter. At the same time, hyperscalers continue to upgrade and expand their datacenter capabilities."

The increases reach across the board -- with volume server revenues up 40 percent to $20 billion, midrange revenue up 39 percent to $2 billion, and high-end systems up 7 percent to $1.3 billion. Dell led the quarter both in revenue and unit shipments, followed in revenues by HPE/New H3C Group, Inspur, Lenovo, IBM and Huawei in a tie, and Cisco. Dell, Inspur, Lenovo and Huawei are up; HPE, IBM and Cisco are down.

But as interesting as the slight jockeying for position among those enterprise vendors may be, it's the largely anonymous manufacturers who are making all the servers powering the hyperscale datacenters that create the Amazon Web Services, Microsoft, Google, Facebook and other clouds that are driving the steadiest growth.

IDC labels those vendors as ODM Direct, for original direct manufacturers who design specifically for a high-scale end customer's specific datacenter needs. Think, for example, about how particular Microsoft is about the system requirements in a modular Azure datacenter. It's not interested in off-the-shelf servers.

That group of ODM Direct vendors accounted for $6.3 billion in collective revenue, a gain of 52 percent year over year, and collectively above Dell's individual $4 billion in revenues.

Another rough way to think about this booming server market is that about one in four new servers are bound for the cloud.

Posted by Scott Bekker on December 12, 2018 at 10:24 AM0 comments


Nadella's Task: Help Other Companies Make Money Off Microsoft

Satya Nadella rolled out a piece of Microsoft math that longtime Microsoft partners are accustomed to hearing, but it's a good message to hear repeated from the top.

Speaking to Forbes in an interview posted Monday, Microsoft's CEO talked about how Microsoft does best when other companies are making money off its products. The comments took the form of recounting conversations with Microsoft Co-Founder Bill Gates.

"Bill used to teach me, 'Every dollar we make, there's got to be five dollars, ten dollars on the outside,'" Nadella told Forbes.

Gates also reminded Nadella that great companies were once built on Microsoft's code, and tasked him with rebuilding Microsoft brick by brick until it can happen again. "That's what I want us to rediscover."

The short article about the interview covers Nadella's efforts to build up enough industry trust in Microsoft to credibly acquire GitHub without causing a community revolt, as well as efforts to reduce the institutional arrogance inside Microsoft that can be a side effect of success.

Read more here.

Posted by Scott Bekker on December 10, 2018 at 10:22 AM0 comments


Microsoft Teams Rockets Past Slack in Enterprise Chat Race

Riding on Office 365's success, the Microsoft Teams collaborative chat application has raced ahead of the more entrenched Slack.

That's a key takeaway of a recent Spiceworks survey of its community of IT professionals. The firm saw Teams surge seven times in usage share over two years, with the 900 respondents in North America and EMEA projecting another doubling of usage over the next two years.

"The sudden rise of Microsoft Teams is likely influenced by the fact that it's available at no additional cost to Office 365 users," said Peter Tsai, senior technology analyst at Spiceworks, in a statement accompanying the survey results Monday.

According to the Spiceworks survey, Microsoft's own Skype for Business has the biggest share at 44 percent. However, Slack-versus-Teams is the high-profile battleground, and in just two years since its launch, Teams has vaulted ahead according to the survey. Teams is now at 21 percent share, up from 3 percent in 2016. Slack is at 15 percent, up from 13 percent two years ago.

Looking ahead to the end of 2020, 53 percent of users expect to be using Skype for Business, 41 percent expect to be using Teams, 18 percent expect to be using Slack and 12 percent expect to be using Google Hangouts.

"Although Skype for Business has maintained the lead overall, Microsoft is putting more of an emphasis on Microsoft Teams as the default communications app for Office 365, which is enticing organizations to give it a try. As a result, we'll likely see Teams adoption rates double in the next couple years," Tsai said.

The survey found that overall usage of chat apps is increasing among businesses, with usage up 20 percentage points to 62 percent this year compared to 2016. At the same time, the expectation that chat apps will supplant e-mail is down among IT pros to 16 percent from 25 percent two years ago.

As they shift to Teams, organizations seem to be trading innovation and usability for security. Survey respondents found Slack the most innovative. They ranked Teams fourth for reliability, compatibility and user-friendliness, behind Skype for Business, Slack and Google Hangouts, respectively. But Teams was viewed as the leader for security, manageability and cost-effectiveness.

Posted by Scott Bekker on December 10, 2018 at 12:25 PM0 comments


IoT: Which Azure Service When?

If it seems like Microsoft provides two or three different Azure services to accomplish any task, that's probably because, in a lot of cases, it's true.

For the emerging area of Internet of Things (IoT), developers face a confusing array of choices in a few different areas within the Azure catalog of services. As part of a session at the Live! 360 conference in Orlando this week, Eric Boyd offered attendees some guidance on a couple of key architectural questions.

Boyd, the founder and CEO of responsiveX and a Microsoft Azure MVP and Microsoft Regional Director, has spent time the last few years experimenting with a burgeoning collection of IoT devices and components in his home and with the ways he can use Azure services to light up and connect the devices.

From watching his enthusiasm during a running demo throughout his presentation with a Raspberry Pi, you could tell he's been doing it partly because it's fun. The larger purpose has been getting to know the technology so well that he can help his clients figure out how to implement IoT in meaningful ways.

"What the IoT is all about is not tinkering and building the Raspberry Pi. It's about taking all the everyday things in our life and connecting them," Boyd said. "IoT is the new norm. This is just like Web and mobile. It is just the way now. It's certainly something that a lot of you should be thinking about as you look out at devices on your factory floor or agricultural scenarios."

Connecting those devices is where Azure comes in, and the services can be overwhelming. For example, when it comes to messaging, a developer might be confused by the options of Service Bus, Event Hubs or IoT Hub. All can be, and have been, used in IoT solutions. Boyd offered a succinct overview in his session.

"OK, there are all these messaging services in Azure. When do I use which service?" Boyd asked. "IoT Hub is built on Event Hubs. If you don't have a scenario where you have devices -- and I use that term loosely because that can mean a lot of things, but if you have applications where you're wanting to stream data in -- Event Hubs is the better solution for you. If you have devices, then IoT Hub is the right fit. We did IoT before IoT Hub in Azure using things like Service Bus. We built a massive kiosk network in Azure that you guys have all been customers of. But IoT Hub simplifies things [for IoT scenarios]."

Boyd also offered a way to think about the difference between IoT Central and IoT solution accelerators, two different services in the Azure catalog both intended for developers getting started with IoT. Both can get you up and running quickly, but IoT Central is more limiting. "It probably isn't your long-term strategy," Boyd explained.

"Azure IoT Central is a SaaS service. You can think of it like Office 365 for IoT. You can just go spin up a service really quickly without having to think about code. It's not a bad service. If you want to just kick the tires and prove something out and demo it to your executive group, it's great for that. It may be a good service to go pilot some things, as well," he said.

You can also get off to a quick start with the IoT solution accelerators, but those are much better as a starting point for an enterprise solution, he explained. The accelerators automatically spin up various IoT-related services for canonical, pre-built scenarios, including remote monitoring, connected factory, predictive maintenance or device simulation.

"This looks similar, but it's not the same," Boyd said of the accelerators in comparison to IoT Central. "You can modify it, redeploy it. The code for this dashboard, unlike IoT Central, is available to you, so you can tweak and customize it however you need it."

Related:

Posted by Scott Bekker on December 06, 2018 at 10:05 AM0 comments


Microsoft's 'AI for Everyone' Plans Detailed at Live! 360

A Microsoft program manager this week gave some insight into the ways that artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities are shaping the Microsoft stack -- sometimes in surprising ways.

Pranav Rastogi, who led Tuesday's keynote of the inaugural Artificial Intelligence Live! track at the Live! 360 conference, is one of the people inside Microsoft helping drive those capabilities and technologies across the company's vast array of products. Rastogi provided attendees with an overview of what those technologies are and where they're starting to emerge in products.

"The idea here is really to democratize AI for each and every employee so that it's available and employees can use it to transform their own businesses," Rastogi told an audience of several hundred attendees at the Orlando conference.

During his hour-long talk, Rastogi provided a tour of AI technologies that can immediately be leveraged by developers, end user and business analysts. To date, AI has mostly been the domain of data scientists. Rastogi's discussion dealt with the other user profiles who may not think of themselves as potential users of AI right now. An example was a slide labeled, "Introducing the Citizen Data Scientist."

All of the AI technologies he highlighted fit into a bucket that Data Relish Ltd. Principal Jen Stirrup, another speaker at the conference, described Tuesday as the types of machine learning capabilities that are commonly coming online right now -- training computers to do a single task at roughly a human level of proficiency. That's as opposed to the strong AI of self-directed fictional scenarios like R2-D2 in "Star Wars," Skynet in "The Terminator" or HAL 9000 in "2001."

For Microsoft, the AI democratization journey has three phases. First is infusing every Microsoft application with some AI capabilities so that early adopter customers can leverage the technologies if they're looking for them. The second phase involves bringing AI to every business process, which would mean driving adoption among users both through increased ease of use and raising awareness of the vertical and horizontal benefits of using Microsoft's tools. The final phase is getting every employee at all of Microsoft's customers using the AI capabilities in some way.

The "every application" phase is in the early stages but spreading quickly across many products, making the effort already broad, if not particularly deep. As an example, Rastogi showed how Microsoft is redefining existing applications with AI using the pre-built AI services, such as Vision, Speech, Language and Search. Those capabilities are being used to create new conversational experiences inside other applications like Microsoft's own Cortana, Office and Skype, as well as other applications like Slack, Facebook Messenger and Kik Messenger.

Rastogi also showed how dense the company's flagship AI platform, Azure, is getting with machine learning capabilities. At the first level are the sophisticated pre-trained models that are ready to be called from within other applications, such as the Vision, Speech, Language and Search services mentioned earlier. The lengthy list of Azure services also includes a few designed to help data science and development teams, such as Azure DataBricks, Azure Machine Learning and Machine Learning VMs. Additionally, Rastogi highlighted the Azure options for using AI-optimized hardware in Microsoft's datacenters, and for having the compute performed in the cloud, on-premises or at the edge.

The product set where the "AI everywhere" story appears strongest is in Power BI, Microsoft's business intelligence platform for accessing, manipulating and visualizing data. A product that essentially aimed to democratize BI is now evolving to do the same for AI, as well. There are capabilities for data scientists, certainly, including Power Query integration for Azure Machine Learning and integrations with Azure frameworks. Data scientists and BI professionals can also script in R or Python or create machine learning models via clicking.

But end users also have ways to explore AI through Power BI, using Natural Language exploration. Examples of the types of things that end users or business analysts can leverage in Power BI include sentiment analysis, key-phrase extraction, optical character recognition and text translation.

Most of the AI capabilities Microsoft enables today still require a lot of leading-edge expertise, integration, development work and data science expertise. Yet it's clear that Microsoft is working rapidly to integrate those technologies all the way out to end-user-facing applications and will continue to push hard in that direction.

Posted by Scott Bekker on December 05, 2018 at 9:42 AM0 comments


Spotlight on Microsoft's AI Advances at Live! 360

A major focus of this week's Live! 360 conference in Orlando, Fla., will be artificial intelligence (AI) and its impact on Microsoft-focused developers and IT professionals.

Live! 360 is hosted by Converge360, the parent company of RCPmag.com, and brings together Converge360's events for one combined conference, with each event as a track. In addition to Visual Studio Live!, SQL Server Live!, TechMentor, Office & SharePoint Live! and ModernApps Live!, this year the conference is rolling out an entire Artificial Intelligence Live! track.

"We are excited about the AI Live launch and how that ties in nicely with our overall program of incubating new topics at Live! 360 and giving the Live! 360 attendees the opportunity to broaden their educational reach and knowledge base by attending any sessions across the six events," said Brent Sutton, vice president of Converge360 Events.

Headlining the AI track is a Tuesday morning keynote from Pranav Rastogi, a program manager at Microsoft who focuses on making developers successful with AI. His keynote is "Enabling Enterprise Developers in AI -- How Microsoft is Doing It." AI has been a huge messaging push for Microsoft over the last year and a half, and Rastogi is expected to talk about Microsoft technologies that support AI projects, as well as how Microsoft is using the approaches internally and in customer implementations.

Andrew Brust, conference co-chair for the Artificial Intelligence Live! track, as well as for the Visual Studio and SQL Server tracks, says the Live! 360 AI content will reflect the conference's roots in giving developers practical guidance.

"Most of the AI conferences out there are really like data science conferences. We will have that content, but not only that. Because it's VS Live!, we will have content for developers [about AI bots and features]," Brust said. "It's AI aimed at developers rather than AI aimed at AI specialists."

One example of the type of content that Live! 360 specializes in is being run by Brust, and will cover new AI features that Microsoft has just integrated into Power BI and how to make use of those capabilities. Another is a workshop by experienced BI expert Jen Stirrup on how BI professionals can transition into AI.

The main technology keynote for all conference tracks is on Wednesday, when Donovan Brown, the Principal DevOps Manager at Microsoft's Cloud Developer Advocacy Team, presents on "Enterprise Transformation." The talk will focus on the transition of Microsoft Visual Studio Team Services from a three-year waterfall delivery cycle to three-week iterations, open source elements and the Git Virtual File System.

Also Wednesday, James Montemagno, Microsoft Principal Program Manager in the Mobile Developer Tools unit, is scheduled to deliver an authoritative session on the future of .NET and Visual Studio.

Some of the other major technologies and themes being addressed by the more than 100 expert speakers this year include containers and the Azure Kubernetes Service, Azure Cosmos DB, PowerApps, Microsoft Flow, Windows Server 2019, Windows 10 updates, Microsoft Graph, Internet of Things (IoT) and Office 365 security.

Posted by Scott Bekker on December 03, 2018 at 9:50 AM0 comments


Microsoft Readies FastTrack PR Blitz

Microsoft is taking FastTrack on a world tour to raise the profile of the cloud onboarding service with tech professionals and developers.

Microsoft and partners have a love-hate relationship with FastTrack. Microsoft loves the program because it helps boost consumption of cloud services, a key metric for the company and a critical goal for retaining subscriptions to Office 365 and other cloud services. Partners often counter that the program zeroes-out formerly profitable routine migration services, while still devaluing in customers' eyes the more complicated migrations that partners must take over when the FastTrack desk's remote and automated capabilities fall short.

Microsoft defines FastTrack as a "customer success service." In three years, as of September, Microsoft claims to have onboarded 40,000 customers and migrated more than 6.5 petabytes of data through the service, which is included in the price of Microsoft cloud subscriptions.

The company had a big presence for FastTrack at the Microsoft Ignite show in September, with an expo presence and more than 20 FastTrack-related sessions. Next month, Microsoft begins a 17-city tour to bring Ignite material to customers around the world, and the FastTrack team is among the most enthusiastic Microsoft groups participating in the tour.

The free, two-day Microsoft Ignite | The Tour sessions kick off in December in Berlin and São Paulo. Next year, the tour will hit Toronto; Singapore; Tel Aviv; Johannesburg; Milan; Washington, D.C.; Sydney; Hong Kong; London; Amsterdam; Dubai; Seoul; Mexico City; and Stockholm before wrapping up in Mumbai in late May.

In the condensed context of Microsoft Ignite | The Tour, the FastTrack elements will include 15-minute theater sessions and breakout sessions with an emphasis on deploying Microsoft 365 products, and details about the app remediation services of Desktop App Assure.

Posted by Scott Bekker on November 26, 2018 at 11:36 AM0 comments


In a Falling Tide, Microsoft's Market Cap is Largest

When stocks in the tech sector were rising, Apple and Amazon both drove the trend and benefited from it, reaching market caps over $1 trillion, with Microsoft and Alphabet close behind.

Now that the tech sector is falling along with markets overall, Microsoft is falling less quickly.

In mid-day trading Monday, Microsoft surpassed Apple as the most valuable company in the United States. Microsoft's market capitalization was $812 billion, about $1 billion higher than Apple's.

News has been rough for Apple over the last few weeks, with the stock losing nearly a quarter of its value since a September high on reports of drops in smartphone demand. Microsoft, on the other hand, continues to deliver on its pivot from a Windows-first to a cloud-first business.

Even though Microsoft seems to have regained supremacy from Apple on this one business measure (for the moment, at least), Microsoft stock is nearly 9 percent off its record high from early October.

Posted by Scott Bekker on November 26, 2018 at 11:29 AM0 comments


Look for New Conversational AI Resources from Microsoft After Acquisition

An acquisition this week by Microsoft should result in new resources for partners interested in building conversational artificial intelligence (AI) experiences.

Microsoft on Wednesday announced it had signed an agreement to acquire XOXCO, based in Austin, Texas. Like most of the dozen-plus acquisitions Microsoft makes each year, terms weren't disclosed, which usually indicates a fairly small company and a small team.

In a blog post about the deal, Lili Cheng, Microsoft corporate vice president for Conversational AI at Microsoft, described XOXCO as "a software product design and development studio known for its conversational AI and bot development capabilities." Cheng cited examples of XOXCO's previous work, including Howdy, a meeting scheduling bot for Slack; and Botkit, a set of development tools that is popular on GitHub.

"We have shared goals to foster a community of startups and innovators, share best practices and continue to amplify our focus on conversational AI, as well as to develop tools for empowering people to create experiences that do more with speech and language," Cheng wrote.

Given Microsoft's sizable internal investments over the last few years on the digital personal assistant Cortana, the Microsoft Bot Framework, natural language processing and other AI-related services, it's unclear from the brief blog post how much new capability XOXCO brings to the company. However, Cheng notes that Microsoft has partnered with XOXCO on projects over the last few years.

One area that will be interesting to watch is how XOXCO plays into Microsoft's ongoing effort to push Teams as a competitor to Slack. The XOXCO Web site is currently replete with references to Slack, and a $1.5 million funding round three years ago was all about developing for Slack.

As one of the early movers in the Slack commercial ecosystem, will XOXCO become a Microsoft effort to have a presence on that platform, or will the team's expertise be redirected to building bots, tools and add-ons for Teams exclusively?

Posted by Scott Bekker on November 14, 2018 at 12:15 PM0 comments


SherWeb Unveils Office 365 Bundle for Partners

SherWeb is bundling some add-on solutions for Office 365 at the same base price as the underlying Microsoft cloud service to give managed service providers (MSPs) a more complete offering for customers out of the gate.

SherWeb is one of the Indirect Providers in the Microsoft Cloud Solution Provider (CSP) program, sitting between Microsoft and CSP Indirect Resellers, who sell Microsoft cloud products to customers.

The Sherbrooke, Quebec-based company unveiled the new Office 365 bundle on Wednesday, which adds security, backup and e-learning components to base Microsoft offerings, such as Office 365 or Microsoft 365.

The products include Office Protect, a one-click threat protection solution using best practice security settings; Online Backup, a backup service of 1GB per user for data and Office 365 mailboxes; and QuickHelp, which is a personalized e-learning platform designed to increase Office 365 user adoption and productivity for customers.

Plans that the Office 365 bundle comes with include Office 365 Business Premium, Office 365 Business Essentials, Office 365 Enterprise E1/E3/E5, Microsoft 365 Business and Microsoft 365 E1/E3.

In a statement, Jason Brown, vice president of products for SherWeb, declared the new offering the core Office 365 bundle from SherWeb.

"We see this as an evolution of Office 365 for partners in adding more value and providing them with the opportunity to create new products and services, and complement their managed services business," Brown said.

Posted by Scott Bekker on November 07, 2018 at 9:51 AM0 comments